Plugable USB 2.0 7-Port High Speed Charging Hub with 60W Power Adapter


#1

This items says that it is capable of 60w, if all 7 ports are running something 10 watts, does this mean the the power may dip? -
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plugable-Cha…

Do you have anything that can handle 70-80 watts?


#2

Hello,

Thanks for asking! We do not have a hub with a larger power adapter. 60W is our most powerful model. We speak about the power on our website as such:

Q: Can the hub support 7 devices which charge at the full BC 1.2 CDP 1.5A rate?

A: Yes, the supplied power adapter delivers 12A of available current across all USB ports which leaves us 1.5A left over (7 * 1.5A = 10.5A). Non BC 1.2 devices max out at only 500mA per the USB 2.0 specification leaving ample power for every port to be used at the same time.

Thank you!


#3

Hi Thanks for the reply.

Its just we have been using these ones -
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B…

But we want ones with numbers for each usb port like the one i showed -
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plugable-Cha…

I’m not sure what you mean about BC devices…I am in the UK…and the things that are plugging into this device are all the same…but there is an instant spike on the power of the plugged in device when a function on the device is triggered. So i want to ensure that the 2nd usb device above (numbered one) functions exactly like the top one we have been using previously.

The device plugging into it runs at 2amp but when triggered it can spike to 2.5amp for a very brief moment. Its important that all devices plugged in do work at the same time.


#4

Hi Jay,

It sounds like you may be using some sort of proprietary device that draws power from USB. The USB2-HUB7BC expects to output no more than 1.5A per port, and beyond that we can’t guarantee results.

“Dumb” charging devices that just pull power without negotiating with the host charger can be very dangerous fire hazards, and we don’t recommend ever using them with a standard USB hub. Most devices that pull more than standard USB currents are “Smart” charging devices that negotiate with the device they’re attached to before pulling any power, to prevent over-current situations that can cause damage and fires.

Hope that helps!


#5